Format Icon: 

Format Icon Text: 

Education XPress First

Imagine sitting in a lecture hall and hearing the phrase, “prepare Golgi membranes from CHO 15 B1 cells after infecting them with VSV.” Can you visualize the process or molecular components involved? If you are an experienced biologist, then you likely performed an experiment similar to this, or at least are familiar enough with the ideas that you have no problem forming a picture in your brain of what this procedure would involve. Most of our undergraduate students are not experienced biologists, however, and have only a year or two of biology experience at Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) when entering classes that discuss experiments at this level of detail. Most of the biology core courses do not have an associated lab component; therefore we need to develop teaching strategies to best support students learning these experimental concepts. During the fall of 2014, we, the MITx Biology team [1] partnered with Professors Frank Solomon and Adam Martin of the Department of Biology to create videos addressing experimental design to enhance the undergraduate learning experience in the sophomore-level cell biology course (7.06).

This course is an introduction to moral and political philosophy. It explores classical and contemporary theories of justice, and applies these theories to contemporary legal and political controversies. Topics include affirmative action, income distribution, same-sex marriage, the role of markets, debates about rights (human rights and property rights), arguments for and against equality, dilemmas of loyalty in public and private life. The course invites students to subject their own views on these controversies to critical examination.
       —from the JusticeX syllabus

Justice is an introduction to moral and political philosophy, including discussion of contemporary dilemmas and controversies.

ER22x was offered as a HarvardX open online course in Spring 2013 on edX, a platform for massive open online courses (MOOCs). It was taught by Professor Michael Sandel.

The term “copyright system” encompasses three levels of material: theory (the arguments, drawn primarily from economics, political theory, and philosophy, concerning why and how the law should regulate uses of expressive materials); doctrine (the rules currently in force concerning uses of expressive materials and the ways in which those rules are typically interpreted and applied); and practice (how those rules affect various fields of art, industry, and culture—literature, music, film, photography, journalism, software design, architecture, fashion, comedy, games, and so forth).

CopyrightX is an online course on Copyright Law. The course explores current copyright law and the ongoing debates concerning how that law should be reformed. Through a combination of pre-recorded lectures, weekly seminars, live webcasts, and online discussions, participants in the course examine how law seeks to stimulate creative expression.

“Mechanics ReView presents a college-level introductory mechanics class using a strategic problem-solving approach.”  —edx.org

This report was produced jointly by the MIT Office of Digital Learning, and the HarvardX Research Committee.

January 21, 2014

“An introduction to development economics, from the urgent issues of global poverty and economics models that might explain them, to the policy implications of those models.” —edx.org

This report was produced jointly by the MIT Office of Digital Learning, and the HarvardX Research Committee.

January 21, 2014

“8.02x presents the basic concepts of Electromagnetism, and how this touches upon a vast variety of interesting real-world physics.” —edx.org

This report was produced jointly by the MIT Office of Digital Learning, and the HarvardX Research Committee.

January 21, 2014

“7.00x lets you explore the secret of life by guiding you through the basics of biochemistry, genetics, molecular biology, recombinant DNA, genomics, and rational medicine.”  —edx.org

This report was produced jointly by the MIT Office of Digital Learning, and the HarvardX Research Committee.

January 21, 2014

“6.002x teaches the fundamentals of circuit and electronic analysis.”  —edx.org

This report was produced jointly by the MIT Office of Digital Learning, and the HarvardX Research Committee.

January 21, 2014

“6.00x is an introduction to computer science as a tool to solve real-world analytical problems.”  —edx.org

This report was produced jointly by the MIT Office of Digital Learning, and the HarvardX Research Committee.

January 21, 2014

“3.091x explains chemical principles by examination of the properties of materials.”  —edx.org

This report was produced jointly by the MIT Office of Digital Learning, and the HarvardX Research Committee.

January 21, 2014

Pages

Subscribe to RSS - Course Reports